Mil Familias: SB1K

Mil Familias: SB1K

Mil Familias website
In the United States, Latino people bear a disproportionate burden of cardio-metabolic disease for a complex set of reasons, many of which are unknown or poorly understood. New technologies and data analytics are now providing us with the first real opportunity to understand the complete interaction of these variables. Breaking the code on this interplay of factors promises a breakthrough in helping not only this fast growing segment of the U.S. population, but also high-risk populations across the globe.
 
More locally, in Santa Barbara County, the Latino “minority” ethnic group comprises 191,250 or 43% of the total population, and rates of cardio-metabolic disease are already persistently higher than in the background population due to a combination of factors beyond genetic or biological risk, including behavior, psychology, and society. For SDRI, its sponsor (Lilly), and its local partners, further research on factors affecting this population provides an opportunity to improve health and provide meaningful resources to decrease cardio-metabolic risk in this population. Therefore, SB1K aims to understand what maintains Latino health and what causes illness, and measure the feedback loops between genetics, biology, behavior, psychology, and society within a bio-behavioral ecosystem.
Study Design
The ten-year SB1K Program is a longitudinal, prospective, cohort study that will operate via three coordinated and iterative approaches: data collection, healthcare access, and intervention. The entire SB1K Program spans ten years and five phases outlined below:
 
Phase 1: Year 1, operational pilot involving up to 100 adult Latino individuals
Phase 2: Year 2, scale to 500 families, including children and young people
Phase 3: Year 3, establish cohort of 1,000 families
Phase 4: Analyze the impact of the 5 Determinants of Human Health
Phase 5: Collaborative interventions, submitted as separate studies
For more information contact:
Charis Hoppe choppe@sansum.org