Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes 

Type 2 diabetes or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes glucose (sugar) - your body's source of energy.

With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. A normal glucose level is between 80-120.
The glycated hemoglobin test, or A1C test, is a blood test that provides an average of your blood glucose levels for the past three months, rather than just a test of your current level.
Unaffected by recent meals, the A1C test measures the percentage of hemoglobin — an oxygen-transporting protein in red blood cells — to which glucose is bound. A high percentage (more than 6.5 percent) indicates diabetes.
More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating healthy, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugars, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy.
Type 2 diabetes develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. Exactly why this happens is unknown, although genetics and environmental factors, such as excess weight and inactivity, seem to be contributing factors.

Warning Signs & Symptoms:

  • Blurred vision. 
  • Increased thirst
  • Itchy or dry skin
  • Frequent urination. 
  • Increased hunger
  • Weight loss. 
  • Fatigue. 
  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. 
  • Areas of darkened skin.